Uk millionaire maker

Euromillions statistics

UK Tax Implications

While there is no tax on lottery winnings in the UK, there are a number of important considerations to keep in mind if you are lucky enough to bank a substantial amount such as a EuroMillions jackpot.

Inheritance Tax

Inheritance tax (IHT) is paid when a UK resident dies and their estate is worth more than £325,000. Everything above that threshold will be taxed at 40 percent. If you win a large EuroMillions prize and your estate exceeds the £325,000 valuation, you should be aware of the rules regarding IHT and how it will affect your heirs.

It is very common for big winners to want to share their jackpot in some way, but if you want to make a gift without paying tax you must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Give the gift more than seven years before you die.
  • Give the gift to your husband, wife, or civil partner.
  • Give less than your annual allowance of £3,000.

The seven-year rule is in place to stop people from giving money away just before they die so that they can avoid IHT. As long as you live for at least seven years after making your gift, you can give as much as you want to whoever you want without it being liable for IHT.

If you were to die within seven years, the recipient would have to pay IHT based on a sliding scale. The rate of tax is the full 40% if there are less than three years between you giving your gift and dying, and then it goes down to 32% in years three to four, 24% in years four to five, 16% in years five to six and 8% if there are between six and seven years between your gift and your death.

Any gifts made to your spouse or civil partner are exempt from IHT, so it would not matter if you died within seven years. You can also give gifts to any registered charity without being liable for tax, along with some national organisations, such as the National Trust, universities or museums.

You can also take advantage of the £3,000 ‘gift allowance’ each year without incurring IHT. If you give away more than this amount and pass away within seven years, the recipient would have to pay tax. It is possible to carry over your leftover allowance from one tax year to the next, but only up to a maximum of £6,000.

Other Tax-free Gifts

You can also give smaller gifts of up to £250 to as many people as you want without them being subject to IHT, although this would not include anyone who has already received gifts totalling the whole £3,000 annual exemption.

Wedding gifts can also be exempt from IHT, but only if they are made before the wedding and there has to be proof that the marriage does go ahead. You can make wedding gifts of up to £5,000 to a child, £2,500 to a grandchild or great-grandchild or £1,000 to anyone else. You can also make gifts to help pay the living costs of an ex-spouse, an elderly dependent or a child.

Syndicates

Lottery rules in the UK stipulate that only one person can be paid a prize, so when playing in a syndicate it is essential to have a formal agreement in place to show to tax authorities. This will prove the money was not just a gift and that everyone is entitled to their share. Anyone playing in an informal syndicate should be aware that they may have to pay inheritance tax on the full amount if the syndicate leader dies within seven years of the prize money being shared.

Tax on Interest

Most people can earn some interest from their savings without paying tax, but this might not be the case if you win a large enough EuroMillions prize. While there is no tax on the initial sum paid into your account, it may be that the win starts to produce an income through interest. This will then be taxed as part of your normal income tax.

Number Frequency Table

See how many times each ball has been drawn. The main numbers are shown in blue and the Lucky Stars in yellow.

1
Drawn:40 times

2
Drawn:35 times

3
Drawn:39 times

4
Drawn:47 times

5
Drawn:36 times

6
Drawn:39 times

7
Drawn:39 times

8
Drawn:38 times

9
Drawn:45 times

10
Drawn:31 times

11
Drawn:44 times

12
Drawn:45 times

13
Drawn:35 times

14
Drawn:41 times

15
Drawn:40 times

16
Drawn:38 times

17
Drawn:36 times

18
Drawn:33 times

19
Drawn:46 times

20
Drawn:34 times

21
Drawn:47 times

22
Drawn:35 times

23
Drawn:37 times

24
Drawn:37 times

25
Drawn:38 times

26
Drawn:38 times

27
Drawn:30 times

28
Drawn:26 times

29
Drawn:42 times

30
Drawn:36 times

31
Drawn:35 times

32
Drawn:32 times

33
Drawn:32 times

34
Drawn:31 times

35
Drawn:38 times

36
Drawn:44 times

37
Drawn:44 times

38
Drawn:43 times

39
Drawn:31 times

40
Drawn:36 times

41
Drawn:38 times

42
Drawn:38 times

43
Drawn:34 times

44
Drawn:38 times

45
Drawn:39 times

46
Drawn:31 times

47
Drawn:36 times

48
Drawn:29 times

49
Drawn:40 times

50
Drawn:54 times

Millionaire Maker Codes

The most recent winning UK Millionaire Maker codes can be found below. Check them against the combinations on your EuroMillions tickets to see if you are due a £1 million prize.

Draw Date Code(s) Drawn
Tuesday29th September 2020

HZMM71166

Friday25th September 2020

TWLK89394

Tuesday22nd September 2020

MWLK51095

Friday18th September 2020 20 UK Millionaire Maker Numbers Drawn
Tuesday15th September 2020

HTKG23805

Total UK Millionaire Maker Codes Drawn

Number of Draws
1059

Total in Prizes*
£2,101,000,000

Number of Codes
2,090

* This amount includes the £1 Million Every Month for a Year raffle.

You may also find these help sections useful:

Lost and damaged tickets

If you lose your ticket or damage one to the point where it cannot be read or scanned, you should contact your National Lottery for advice on what to do next. If you have a winning ticket that has been lost or damaged you need to report it as soon as possible after the winning draw, as your claim may be invalidated if you leave it too late.

You can find the contact details for the UK and Ireland national lotteries above.

Claiming prizes

There are different ways to claim EuroMillions prizes depending on how much you win, whether your entry was bought in-store or online, and which country the ticket was bought in. Generally, smaller prizes can be claimed for lottery retailers, while larger prizes need to be redeemed from a regional office or lottery headquarters.

Go to the How to Claim page to find out all you need to know about claiming EuroMillions prizes in each participating country.

Tickets purchased in other EuroMillions countries

EuroMillions prizes can only be claimed in the same country that the winning ticket was purchased in. For example, if you buy a ticket in Spain, you will not be able to claim any prizes won on it in the UK, and vice versa.

If you do win a prize on a EuroMillions ticket bought in another country, you’ll need to contact the country’s lottery provider to find out if you can make any alternative arrangements to claim the prize — please note that this would be at the discretion of the selling lottery. Visit the dedicated page for playing EuroMillions abroad to find contact details for the lottery providers in each of the participating countries.

Identifying a lottery scam

Lottery scams are all too common today but there are two golden rules that you should remember in order to protect yourself against them:

  • You cannot win a prize in a lottery you have not entered. If you are ever notified that you have won a prize in a lottery you have not played, it is a scam.
  • No legitimate lottery organisation would demand an upfront fee to pay out your prize money. Again, any message requesting a payment to ‘release’ a lottery prize is a scam.

Go to the Scams page to learn lots more about this type of fraud, including other ways to spot lottery scams.

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